Monday, August 31, 2009

Animal Farm

If you have had enough of our senators and representatives disregard for the Constitution, I highly recommend you surf over to Animal Farm and start reading.

I'm doing my part to make this message viral. One of us can't do it alone, but together we can make an impact. Fax, email, and snail mail them. 3 faxes, 3 emails, 3 snail mails. That's all it takes. Make your voice heard.

Here's the letter to send to your representatives and senators to let them know that you have had enough and you are ready to stand against the corruption:

Dear [Senator or Representative] [your Senators or Representatives name],

“We the People” are tired of what is going on in Washington D.C. “We the People” would like to see you do your real job in Congress, and not make up jobs to keep yourselves busy and waste our tax money, not to mention making unconstitutional law.

Your job in Congress is established in the Constitution under Article 1, Section 8. There are only 18 items listed. Just in case you didn’t know, or have forgotten they will be listed at the end of this letter.

Where is it in the Constitution that Health Care, and Cap and Trade are mentioned? For that matter, where is Social Security, global-warming research, welfare, mass transit, food stamps, minimum wage, Medicaid, Medicare, and unemployment insurance?

You can point to “general welfare” in Article 1, Section 8, to account for your unlimited power you think you possess, but if you knew your history of the United States and the Constitution, you would know that “general welfare” did not mean the welfare of the people. Here is the 1828 edition of Noah Webster’s American Dictionary of the English Language, and how the word “welfare” was defined 40 years after it was written in the Constitution:

WEL´FARE, n. [well and fare, a good going; G. wohlfahrt; D. welvaard; Sw. valfart; Dan. velfærd.]
1. Exemption from misfortune, sickness, calamity or evil; the enjoyment of health and the common blessings of life; prosperity; happiness; applied to persons.
2. Exemption from any unusual evil or calamity; the enjoyment of peace and prosperity, or the ordinary blessings of society and civil government; applies to states.

Welfare did not have the meaning then as it does today. In the Constitution the word “welfare” is used in the context of states. The “welfare of the United States” does not mean the welfare of individuals, people, or citizens.

Here are a few words from our founding fathers on “general welfare” to set you straight:

“If Congress can do whatever in their discretion can be done by money, and will promote the General Welfare, the Government is no longer a limited one, possessing enumerated powers, but an indefinite one….” — James Madison

“Congress has not unlimited powers to provide for the general welfare, but only those specifically enumerated.” –Thomas Jefferson

“Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government.” — James Madison

“I can find no warrant for such an appropriation in the Constitution, and I do not believe that the power and duty of the General Government ought to be extended to the relief of individual suffering which is in no manner properly related to the public service or benefit.” — President Grover Cleveland

“I cannot undertake to lay my finger on that article of the Constitution which granted a right to Congress of expending, on objects of benevolence, the money of their constituents.” — James Madison

It is important that you know your history as well as the Constitution.

Please abide by these rules set forth by our Constitution of these United States of America or face removal from office next election.

Your Constituent,
[Your name]

P. S.
Here is your list of powers authorized to you by the Constitution, Article 1, Section 8, and some more words from our founding fathers.

1. The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defense and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States;

3. To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;

4. To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;

5. To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures;

6. To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States;

7. To establish Post Offices and Post Roads;

8. To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;

9. To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

10. To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offenses against the Law of Nations;

11. To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;

12. To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years;

13. To provide and maintain a Navy;

14. To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;

15. To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;

16. To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;

17. To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings; And

18. To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.

Under the Tenth Amendment: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

More words from our founding fathers:

“We still find the greedy hand of government thrusting itself into every corner and crevice of industry, and grasping at the spoil of the multitude. Invention is continually exercised to furnish new pretenses for revenue and taxation. It watches prosperity as its prey and permits none to escape without a tribute.” — Thomas Paine

“Those who would give up essential Liberty to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” — Ben Franklin

“The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite.” — James Madison

“I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground that ‘all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states or to the people.’ To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress, is to take possession of a boundless field of power not longer susceptible of any definition. — Thomas Jefferson

“The greatest [calamity] which could befall [us would be] submission to a government of unlimited powers.” — Thomas Jefferson

“The powers of the federal government are enumerated; it can only operate in certain cases; it has legislative powers on defined and limited objects, beyond which it cannot extend its jurisdiction.” — James Madison

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